National Post

Greece’s most powerful man: Former student radical holds the cards in Athens
National Post

When Alexis Tsipras, the 37-year-old former student radical poised to become the most powerful man in Greece, sat with no necktie across the negotiating table from middle-aged party bosses, it was clear politics in Athens were about to change.

Mr. Tsipras would withdraw from NATO and close its bases, halt repayment of the national debt, reverse privatizations, seize banks, eliminate sales tax and impose a 75% tax on the rich.

First and foremost, he would tear up the e130-billion bailout that calls for Greece to radically scale back public-sector pensions and wages in return for loans to keep the country afloat.

But even some of Mr. Tsipras’s closest allies are wary of making promises to Greeks that cannot be kept.

“The left must warn the people responsibly. Not only by telling them that the road away from the bailout is also the road that leads to exiting the euro, but also that it will be particularly painful, but with prospects,” Alekos Alavanos, the veteran leftist who picked Mr. Tsipras as his successor as Syriza leader, wrote in an opinion piece

Le cas de la Grèce sera pédagogique. Il va montrer au Québécois ce qui arrive quand un illuminé du type « Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois » met en place son agenda…