Le Top 5 de l'actualité américaine (7-12 octobre) selon le Pew Research Center:

Actualités États-Unis

Violent Crime Captures the Headlines

The coverage of the Oct. 10 shootings at Success Tech Academy in Cleveland had the all-too-familiar elements of the shocking violence in America story.

Though the Cleveland incident evoked mentions of the 1999 Columbine shooting that left 15 dead, the Success Tech case, fortunately, did not result in extensive casualties. (The worst school massacre in U.S. history occurred on April 16, 2007 when 33 people ended up dead on the campus of Virginia Tech.) But last week’s news coverage included three separate incidents that made it a frightening week for random violence in the U.S.

Together, the three incidents accounted for 8% of the total newshole last week as measured in PEJ’s weekly News Coverage Index, which analyzes the content of the news from a range of media. That would have made them collectively the No. 2 story of the week.
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The Cleveland shooting filled 4% of the overall newshole, making it the fifth-biggest story of the week from Oct. 7-12. There was also the Oct. 7 killing spree by a 20-year-old sheriff’s deputy that took six lives in tiny Crandon Wisconsin (ninth-biggest story at 3%). And a Pennsylvania boy who had amassed a weapons arsenal in alleged preparation for an assault on his high school was arrested on Oct. 10. (That story missed the top-10 roster, but did generate 1% of the coverage.)

The top story last week (accounting for 15% of the newshole in the Index), was the Presidential campaign, where a good deal of the coverage was focused on Republican Fred Thompson’s first debate performance. The second-biggest story (at 6%) was immigration, with a federal judge’s ruling against a proposed crackdown on employers generating the most attention to the subject since late June. Events inside Iraq were next at 6%, with the controversy over Blackwater still simmering. And the awarding of the Peace Prize to Al Gore was a major reason why this year’s Nobel awards made up the fourth biggest story at 4%.

Source:
journalism.org
Violent Crime Captures the Headlines